pinoy-culture:

Benevolent Assimilation
and the 1899 Philippine-American War

Three years before Private Willie Grayson shot the first bullet that began the Philippine-American War, a New York news magazine editorial depicted the Filipino as a diminutive black savage ripe for civilizing. In 1896, the United States was poised to further impose its twin mantras of the Monroe Doctrine and Manifest Destiny on lands beyond its continental borders. The Monroe Doctrine was America’s message to its European rivals that the western hemisphere “belonged” to the United States. While the doctrine provided the legal justification for U.S. domination of the Americas, Manifest Destiny provided the moral underpinning: the belief that the United States had a divine mission to rule North America, the western hemisphere, and eventually, the world. The print media of the time was blunt on this matter. “(W)e have been reconnoitering in new territory and have been taking the first steps towards accomplishing our manifest destiny: the control of the world by American manufacturers.” (Iron Age business journal, 1894).

After two centuries of conquering Native American lands, the United States had proven that “he swallows up and will continue to swallow up whatever comes in contact with him, man or empire.” (New York Sun, 1847). By 1898, he was more than prepared to assert that “Now that the continent is subdued, we are looking for fresh new worlds to conquer.” (Overland Monthly, San Francisco , 1898).

America’s imperial agenda was thinly disguised when Admiral George Dewey offered to assist General Emilio Aguinaldo in the Philippine war for independence from Spain. The Philippine Revolution was on the verge of victory in the spring of 1898 when the last of the Spanish garrisons lay under siege in Manila. Protected only by the thick walls of the Intramuros, the Spaniards refused to raise the white flag of surrender to the Filipinos. While Dewey and his fleet of seven war ships were seemingly protecting Manila Harbor and preventing the escape of the Spaniards, he was also waiting for reinforcements from the United States. Only upon the arrival of American troops would Dewey be able to proceed with the American conquest of the Philippines. By the end of July 1898, three battalions had arrived, the third led by General Arthur MacArthur who later became commander of all the U.S. military forces in the Philippines and conducted the pacification campaign.

The Spaniards eventually surrendered, but only after an orchestrated mock battle on Manila Bay with the U.S.. The Spanish “code of honor” prohibited a surrender to former subjects that had defeated them, but whom they considered inferior. To save face, they were only willing to surrender to a “superior” force that briefly fought against them. While the mock battle was being planned and carried out, President William McKinley was preparing to negotiate the terms of Spain’s surrender. America’s “splendid little war” ended on December 10, 1898, with the signing of the Treaty of Paris.

Filipinos were excluded from the planning of their future and that of their incipient nation. Spain became $20 million richer that Christmas in exchange for giving up the Philippines to the United States. The United States, in turn, could now boast at being a bonafide member of elite imperial nations with its acquisition not only of the Philippines, but Guam, Puerto Rico, Samoa, and Hawaii.

The United States Senate had not yet ratified the Treaty of Paris when President McKinley issued his Proclamation of Benevolent Assimilation less than two weeks after the signing of the treaty. In it, McKinley declared “American sovereignty throughout the Philippines by means of force,” and that “the military commander of the United States is enjoined….in installing a new political power….” The president included in the proclamation that “we come not as invaders or conquerors, but as friends, to protect the natives in their homes, in their employment, in their personal and religious rights.”

In the next ten years, a quarter of a million Filipinos would die from raining bullets, tortures, starvation, and diseases from the war. Letters home from American soldiers would boast of “killin’ niggers,” or express disgust at the destruction of entire villages in the name of civilization. News accounts would reveal the slaughter of men, women, and children in Samar and Batangas. Photographic postcards and stereocards would provide pictures of dead Filipinos dumped in open trenches.

Most of the American media heralded the conquest of the Philippines. They frequently demonized Aguinaldo in editorial cartoons. They derided anyone who opposed the annexation of the Philippines. Anti-imperialists, the most vocal of whom came from the upper echelons of American society, were vilified as unpatriotic weaklings. Even those who opposed the war for racist reasons - not wanting another non-white racial group incorporated into the American populace - were not spared the diatribes from those who felt that the conquest was a step forward towards America’s manifest destiny. Thus, prominent Americans like former president Grover Cleveland, industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, writer Mark Twain, and Senator George Hoar were derisively labeled “aunties” or American “Filipinos.” With such strong opposition, the ratification of the Treaty of Paris barely passed - by one vote in the senate.

The republican administrations of McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt were eager to move beyond the Philippine question, but felt compelled to address their critics. They, therefore, moved quickly to pacify the Philippines. By July 4, 1902, the so-called “insurgency”—a war that far surpassed the Spanish American War in human lives and military costs—was unilaterally declared over. The United States committed over 120,000 troops in its pacification campaign. To complete the colonizing project, an army of school teachers was sent to establish the public education system, a system that would remain under direct American control until 1935.

To the Filipinos, the Philippine-American War did not end in July 1902. Fighting continued well into the second decade of the twentieth century. Throughout the next forty years, the United States promulgated a string of laws to realize its policy of “benevolent assimilation.” The Sedition Law that prohibited any public action or support for Philippine independence from the U.S. The Brigandage Act that prohibited membership in armed opposition to American rule. The Reconcentration Act that emptied villages and created concentration camps to deprive rebels of peasant support. The Flag Law that prohibited the display of nationalist flags, banners or symbols, particularly those of the Katipunan. The Municipal Code that limited voting rights to only those who had been public officials, owned property, and could speak, write, and read English or Spanish. At the end of World War Two, the United States added the Bell Trade Act that gave the United States equal access to the exploitation of the Philippine natural resources, and the Rehabilitation Act that required the Philippines to change its constitution to guarantee American access to Philippine natural resources in exchange for post-war rehabilitation money.

The year that the Philippine-American War was declared over, the United States focused its attention on completing the Panama Canal, taking over what France had started and abandoned. Control of the sea lanes between Asia and the commercial centers in the east coast of the United States was integral to the country’s agenda of dominating the Pacific and the western hemisphere. In this part of the world, the principal competition would not come from Europe, but from Japan. Thirty years before bombs fell on Pearl Harbor and Manila, an American statesman expressed what had become obvious: “As to who will be master of the Pacific Ocean is a question to be settled by the United States and Japan….Someone is going to dominate this ocean. If the United States doesn’t do it, then Japan will….Wars are carried on or kept in abeyance today at the dictates of commercialism, and the commercial advantages of being able to dominate trade in the Pacific Ocean are considered worth fighting for…The struggle may break out at almost any moment, but will surely begin as soon as the Panama Canal shall have been finished.” (Rupert, Yellow Peril, 1911)

With the United States firmly established in the Philippines, it now had a strategic position in Asia. And with the “dictates of commercialism” combined with the policy of “benevolent assimilation,” the United States was assured of a reliable stepping stone from which to manifest its self-proclaimed destiny.

So to sum it all up.

  1. After already conquering North America and Native American lands, in 1896 they wanted to further impose the ideals of Manifest Destiny and the Monroe Doctrine beyond the America’s.
  2. The imperialist plans to take over and colonize the Philippines was disguised and hidden to the Filipino’s by deceiving General Emilio Aguinaldo into leaving his exile in Hong Kong to come to the Philippines to finish the fighting for the Filipino’s independence from Spain, and that the Admiral George Dewey and the U.S. was here to support their cause.
  3. While the Filipino’s were the ones actually winning the fights against the Spanish and cornering them into Intramuro’s, Manila, the well known Walled City of the Philippines, and were actually winning the fights against their original Spanish colonizers, due to the Spanish “codes of honor”, they refused to surrender to the Filipino’s, who were the people they conquered and colonized, and saw as inferior to them. For that would be a shame and humiliation to Spain if they surrendered to the people they saw as inferior and they colonized.
  4. While the Filipino’s were winning and fighting for their independence against Spain, Admiral George Dewey was secretly waiting for the ships of U.S. soldiers to arrive while deceiving Aguinaldo and the Filipino’s that the U.S. soldiers who were there now were there to make sure the Spaniards didn’t leave the archipelago. But sadly as history goes, that was all a big white imperialist lie.
  5. When the U.S. fleet finally arrived, the Filipino’s were ordered to stay out of Manila and leave the rest to the Americans. While the Filipino’s were rejoicing thinking that they finally won their independence after almost nearly 400 years of colonial rule from the Spanish and that all their fighting and hard work was coming to fruit, in reality inside the walls of Intramuro’s there was no real fighting or battle. It was a “mock battle”, a battle that the U.S. says they fought and won, when in reality, it was just a “mock battle”, so that the Spaniards could say they lost to a Western power, instead of admitting they lost to the people they colonized. Meanwhile President McKinley was already making negotiations during the Treaty of Paris, which Aguinaldo, our first president, and the Filipino’s who already formed their own government, were kept away from. Basically they were told to keep out of affairs dealing with what would happen with their people and their islands.
  6. After the Treaty of Paris basically Spain got richer and saved face, and the U.S. finally joined the ranks of the other imperialist nations such as England, Portugal, Spain, and France.
  7. Before the Treaty of Paris was even ratified by the Senate President McKinley already proclaimed the “Benevolent Assimilation Proclamation” which to put it bluntly was a proclamation saying, “hey Filipino’s and the Philippines, you belong to the U.S. now, I am your commander, bow down and accept and assimilate to the U.S. because we are “friends” here to save your unholy, savaged, selves, and if you don’t and refuse you will be an insurgent and thus killed.”
  8. After several years of killing men, woman, and children, torturing, bringing of diseases, setting up concentration camps, burning homes and villages, and pretty much making a slaughter of Filipino’s in the righteous name of God and the U.S., they continued and finished off their colonization by bringing American school teachers to come and teach the children and teach them English, more often than not reprimanding them if they spoke their native languages, as well as manipulate the newer generations into thinking that the Spaniards were the evil ones and the the U.S. was their hero’s. Those books used to teach and brainwash that young generation are still being used today to the point where the U.S. successfully did manipulate the population and hide the atrocities they did in the country. Because of this to this day many Filipino’s themselves, both in the Philippines and abroad, have no clue about the genocide and U.S. war crimes and the true events of U.S. colonial rule in the Philippines. It’s a colonial success that still continues today.
akoaykayumanggi:

Saw this on FB just now.
This is just horrid. I didn’t even know this type of stuff still existed in California toward Filipin@’s but apparently what was seen in the 1900’s still exists today.
What could have been said could have been a hell lot worse, but still, fuck.
Anyone in that area know where this is and to contact authorities?
If the California Department of Consumer Affairs really did send this racist and hateful letter to Ms. Brandes, then let’s send them letters of complaint.
Everyone share and spread the word. Contact local authorities of American Canyon, California to get on this case right away.

akoaykayumanggi:

Saw this on FB just now.

This is just horrid. I didn’t even know this type of stuff still existed in California toward Filipin@’s but apparently what was seen in the 1900’s still exists today.

What could have been said could have been a hell lot worse, but still, fuck.

Anyone in that area know where this is and to contact authorities?

If the California Department of Consumer Affairs really did send this racist and hateful letter to Ms. Brandes, then let’s send them letters of complaint.

Everyone share and spread the word. Contact local authorities of American Canyon, California to get on this case right away.

(Source: austro-nesian)

Victory for abused Filipino caregiver

sigawla:

ABUSED FILIPINO CAREGIVER SETTLES WITH EMPLOYER FOR $100,000

By Henni Espinosa, ABS-CBN North America Bureau

Nov. 9, 2012

SAN JOSE, Calif. – Nelly Gonzales, 58, still gets emotional when she talks about her ordeal as a caregiver in the U.S.

For 15 years, Gonzales was abused by her Filipino employer, paying her as low as $150 a month, to care for six developmentally-delayed adults 24/7.

She said, “All I wanted was respect. No matter your stature in life, you deserve some respect.”

It took her 15 long, agonizing years but Gonzales finally found the courage to fight back, after she saw Filipino caregiver Victoria Aquino on Balitang America talk about filing a case against her abusive employer.

She pointed out, “If she could do it, I thought, I could do it too. I could fight for my rights.”

Through the help of the Pilipino Association of Workers and Immigrants or PAWIS, Gonzales filed a claim for back wages against her employer in 2010.

Click here to read full article 

If you are an abused caregiver and want to know how you can fight for your rights, call PAWIS at (408) 657-8947.

Domestic workers in Southern California can also reach the Filipino Migrant Center at (310) 421-8362 or info@filipinomigrantcenter.org. Click here for the FMC website

demnewswire:

Filipino Americans for Obama

Commit to vote | Vote Early | Contribute | Volunteer | Facebook | Twitter

White House Acts on Denied Claims of Filipino WWII Veterans

pag-asaharibon:

Responding to the strong representations made by the Philippine Government and the Filipino-American Community, the White House announced today it is taking a second look into the plight of more than 24,000 aging Filipino veterans who believe that their applications for compensation for services rendered during the Second World War were unfairly denied.

The Philippine Embassy immediately welcomed the White House announcement, saying this is a positive step that underscores the importance the United States places on the outstanding service rendered by Filipinos who fought under the American flag during the Second World War.

In his report to Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert F. Del Rosario, Ambassador Jose L. Cuisia Jr. said the White House announced on Wednesday afternoon, 17 October 2012, the formation of an Interagency Working Group to review the certification process that denied 24,385 individual applications filed under the Filipino Veterans Equity Compensation Fund.

“We would like to assure our veterans that the Philippine Government will continue to exert strong efforts to convince US authorities to address the certification issue and grant them  the benefits they deserve,” the envoy said.

In his report, Ambassador Cuisia thanked Presidential Assistant Chris Lu, Co-Chair of the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, for acting on the concerns of the Filipino veterans as conveyed to the US Government by no less than Secretary Del Rosario, the Philippine Embassy and the Filipino-American Community led by the National Federation of Filipino-American Associations.

It was Lu’s White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, which together with the Office of Management and Budget, recommended the creation of the working group that will look into reports that a significant number of Filipino veterans have been impeded from filing claims or believe their claims were improperly denied.

“The Interagency Working Group will be tasked with analyzing the process faced by these Filipino veterans in demonstrating eligibility for compensation in order to ensure that all applications receive thorough and fair review,” said Lu, who sits as a member of President Obama’s Cabinet.

He said the working group will be made up of representatives from the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, and the National Archives and Record Administration.

“This is part of the Obama Administration’s ongoing efforts to honor the contributions of all veterans in their service to our country,” added Lu, who cited the remarkable contributions of Filipino-Americans to every sector of American life since their first documented arrival in Morro Bay, California, in 1587.

According to retired Maj. Gen. Delfin Lorenzana, head of the Office of Veterans Affairs at the Philippine Embassy, the disqualified veterans comprise 56 percent of the 43,083 surviving veterans who filed their claims under the compensation fund, which grants a one-time lump sum of  $15,000 for veterans who have become US citizens and $9,000 for those who retained their Philippine citizenship.

He said the US Government has so far released a total of $223.7 million to 18,698 Filipino veterans from the $265-million compensation fund that was part of the America Recovery and Reinvestment Act that President Obama signed into law in 2009.

General Lorenzana said the disqualification issue stemmed from the implementing guidelines issued by the Department of Veterans Affairs in 2011 requiring certification from the National Personnel Records Center that the names of veteran-claimants appear in both the Roster of Troops and the Discharge List prepared by the US Army at the end of the Second World War.

“Unfortunately, the claims of a large number of Filipino veterans were not processed because their names appear only in one list or the other but not both,” General Lorenzana said. “What we are requesting the US government is for them to consider all sources of records and not just the two lists.”

Previous posts on this matter:

(Source: philippineembassy-usa.org)

Pinoy Word of the Day: Mapagpaimbabaw

thisisnotpinoy:

(mah-pahg-pah-eem-ba-bao)

Meaning: Hypocrite

Sentence: You say you are proud to be Pinoy but you want the Philippines to be the 51st state. Mapagpaimbabaw ka.

Note: If you want a Filipino tongue twister, this is the word. :P

As tongue twisters go, I always thought the tagalog word for “sorry” was a toughy. “Ikinalulungkot ko.”

Philippines: 51st American state.

pinoy-culture:

akoaykayumanggi:

choco-java:

lakawaiikoala:

ahiddensanctuary:

Curse the commonwealth era. Curse the people who insisted for the Philippines to have it’s freedom. Curse the president who took oath that time.

As you read my introduction, you already knew that I am pro to this issue. Yes, I want the Philippines to be an American Colony. I want the Philippines be part of the stars in the flag of America. I want to be an American citizen. I want to be part of the world’s greatest country. And most of all, I want a better life ahead of me and for me to attain that, I need to embrace to the high hopes that one day the Philippines will eventually be a part of the United States.

Unfollow me if you want to. Say foul words in my ask box if you want to (besides, my anonymous button is always on). But this is my stand. This is, what I believe, for the betterment of our country. I am already sick of reading articles about patriotism and being nationalistic but people keeps on despising or even condemning fellow countrymen if they were subjected to shameful issues. I am already tired of seeing headlines printed in capital letters saying bad things toward this nation. I am already tired of hearing gossips about the fast-rising economy of this country and yet no one in the lower class can feel it.

I want progress. I want change. I want development.

We cannot eliminate corruption because corruption is already part of our system since academe. We are bound to use power to acquire money and other things.

If only we surrendered and let the American people guide us to success, then claiming the islands in our West Philippine Sea would’ve been easier than this.

Oh hey Ligaya~

And I’m tired of people like you, my dear, ahiddensanctuary.^^

Oh thank you Tine for showing me this bullshit. *salutes*

Ok ahiddensanctuary I’m going to break this down for ya, you colonial minded, undeserving to be called Filipin@ twat. If our ancestors were alive today, they would have cut off your head with no shame in your disgrace.

Curse the commonwealth era. Curse the people who insisted for the Philippines to have it’s freedom. Curse the president who took oath that time.

I’m sorry. You don’t know about our colonial history do you? DO YOU? You do not know about what the U.S. did to our people when they colonized do you? Let’s see let me make a list of all the shit they did to us in their 48 years of colonial rule. Shall we? Ya? Ok let’s go.

The Example of Samar: A “Howling Wilderness”

Early in the morning on September 28, 1901 the residents of the small village of Balangiga (located in the Samar Province) attacked the men of U.S. Army Company C, Ninth U.S. Infantry, who were stationed in the area.  While the Americans ate breakfast, church bells in the town began to peal.  This was the signal for hundreds of Filipinos armed with machetes and bolos to attack the garrison.  Forty-eight U.S. soldiers, two-thirds of the garrison, were butchered, in what is called the Balangiga Massacre.  Of the Filipinos who attacked, as many as 150 were killed.

American troops began retaliating as soon as the next day by returning to Balangiga in force and burning the now abandoned village.  General Jacob H. Smith, however, sought to punish the entire civilian population of the Samar province.  Arriving in Samar himself toward the end of October, Smith charged Major Littleton Waller with responsibility for punishing the inhabitants of Samar.  Smith issued Waller oral instructions concerning his duties.  These were recounted as follows (see below) in Smith and Waller’s court martial proceedings the following year in 1902.  These proceedings, indeed attention to the entire matter of U.S. Army conduct in the Philippines, were driven by the appearance of an interview with General Smith in the Manila Times on November 4, 1901.  During this interview, Smith confirmed that these had truly been his orders to Major Waller.

”’I want no prisoners. I wish you to kill and burn: the more you kill and burn, the better you will please me,’ and, further, that he wanted all persons killed who were capable of bearing arms and in actual hostilities against the United States, and did, in reply to a question by Major Waller asking for an age limit, designate the limit as ten years of age. … General Smith did give instructions to Major Waller to ‘kill and burn’ and ‘make Samar a howling wilderness,’ and he admits that he wanted everybody killed capable of bearing arms, and that he did specify all over ten years of age, as the Samar boys of that age were equally as dangerous as their elders.”

Smith carried out his mission by having U.S. troops concentrate the local population into camps and towns.  Areas outside of these camps and towns were designated “dead zones” in which those who were found would be considered insurgents and summarily executed.  Tens of thousands of people were herded into these concentration camps.  Disease was the biggest killer in the camps, although precisely how many lives were lost during Smith’s pacification operations is not known.  For his part, Major Waller reported that over eleven days between the end of October and the middle of November 1901 his men burned 255 dwellings and killed 39 people.  Other officers under Smith’s command reported similar figures.  Concerning the overall number of dead, one scholar estimates that 8,344 people perished between January and April 1902.

The Balangiga bells are still held after being taken, in the U.S. at  to commemorate those U.S. soldiers lost in this battle despite our many attempts of gaining them back to where they rightfully belong.

The Pacification of the Philippines

At the outset of the fighting, American troops in the Philippines numbered around 40,000, but by 1902 this number had risen to 126,000.  During the first phase of the war, Aguinaldo’s men fought and lost a succession of formal battles against the U.S. Army.  In 1900, however, Aguinaldo abandoned head-on conflicts with the Americans and resorted to the guerrilla warfare tactics that had served him and his men so well against the Spanish.

For all the talk of bringing “civilization” to the Philippines, American commanders responded to the Filipino “insurgency” with the utmost brutality.  Over the course of the next decade, and especially in the first few years of the conflict, it became commonplace for entire villages to be burned and whole populations to be imprisoned in concentration camps.  No mercy was accorded to Filipino prisoner, a large number of whom were shot.  This certainly was not in keeping with the spirit of “benevolent assimilation” proclaimed by President McKinley.

From Liberators to Killers: American Attitudes Toward Filipinos

The attitudes of American commanders involved in pacifying the Philippines are remarkable for both their disdain for the people they had allegedly “liberated” and their willingness to resort to the most ruthless methods in suppressing resistance. For example, General J.M. Bell, wrote in December 1901:

“I am now assembling in the neighborhood of 2,500 men who will be used in columns of about fifty men each.  I take so large a command for the purpose of thoroughly searching each ravine, valley and mountain peak for insurgents and for food, expecting to destroy everything I find outside of towns.  All able bodied men will be killed or captured. … These people need a thrashing to teach them some good common sense; and they should have it for the good of all concerned.”

Filipino villagers were forced into concentration camps called reconcentrados which were surrounded by free-fire zones, or in other words “dead zones.” Furthermore, these camps were overcrowded and filled with disease, causing the death rate to be extremely high. Conditions in these “reconcentrados” were inhumane. Between January and April 1902, 8,350 prisoners of approximately 298,000 died. Some camps incurred death rates as high as 20 percent. “One camp was two miles by one mile (3.2 by 1.6 km) in area and ‘home’ to some 8,000 Filipinos. Men were rounded up for questioning, tortured, and summarily executed.”

Do you want me to go on even more? Because I could, oh I could and make an even longer rant and call out your colonial bullshit. Or are you that desperate to have us as a 51st state and don’t give a shit on our recent past and what would happen if we became a state and colonized by the U.S. again? And if that is the case, don’t call yourself a Filipin@ because you aren’t one and our ancestors have disowned you a long time ago.

As you read my introduction, you already knew that I am pro to this issue. Yes, I want the Philippines to be an American Colony.

Ya, sure. Ok. Let’s make it so our people lose land like Hawai’ians currently are. Let’s make it so white tourists take our land and pollute it, disrespect it, call it THEIRS. Let’s go back to their colonization of Filipina’s being made as prostitutes for the U.S. military. Let us go back to people dying and being raped by those white foreigners who will take our lands. Yes LETS. Want to know what has happened to the Hawai’ians since they were illegally made to be the 50th state? Ok here are some more links for ya to know HOW they became an illegal state until this very day, how it’s their colonization has effected them, and how many want to be free from the U.S. to be their own nation.

I want the Philippines be part of the stars in the flag of America. I want to be an American citizen. I want to be part of the world’s greatest country.

I’m sorry? The U.S. is the greatest fuckin’ country in the world? Hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha. Ya. Fuckin’ right. Look here, I’m a U.S. citizen by birth. I was born here to immigrant Filipin@ parents. I was raised here. I live here. It ain’t all pretty sparkles, rainbows, wealth and glory trust me. And here is a newflash for ya. The U.S. is starting to come to its end of a powerful country, just like the U.K. did and Spain did in the past. Get that U.S. is a hero and the best in the world mentality out of your thick fuckin head.

And most of all, I want a better life ahead of me and for me to attain that, I need to embrace to the high hopes that one day the Philippines will eventually be a part of the United States.

You want a better life ahead of you? Really? Because *looks around* you aren’t going to find here, sorry. You want a better life? WORK FOR IT. Have faith in our damn country and do whatever it takes to improve it. Get educated on our past. Get educated on our cultures. Get educated on what is happening in the Philippines in terms of politics and social issues. And from that do something about it. Those who come to the U.S. to study, go back to the Philippines and take back what you learned and use it to help improve the country. Stop buying into all what the media says and lies. Look at South Korea for example. South Korea was one of the most impoverished countries only several years ago and looked up to the Philippines at one point. The people got motivated, worked hard, and got themselves out of that poverty fairly quickly and now look at them now. They believed in themselves and country. They sent their people to the U.S. and elsewhere to get a better education than they can give them in the country at that time and they returned back to help their people and country to the point they became the most fast growing country in terms of economy and wealth. You want the Philippines to get out of its poverty state? Take example of what South Korea did and take pride in your people, your country, and WORK HARD FOR IT.

Do you know how much I want to go back to the Philippines so I can do the same? A Filipina born in New York City, one of the greatest and well known cities in the world, and I want to leave it all. I want to live and work and stay in the Philippines and help improve it and the lives of my people in anyway I can. Why? Because I have faith in my homeland and people and THAT is something a lot of Filipin@’s like you, lack.

But this is my stand. This is, what I believe, for the betterment of our country. I am already sick of reading articles about patriotism and being nationalistic but people keeps on despising or even condemning fellow countrymen if they were subjected to shameful issues.

Again for the betterment of our country. Ok righttt. Nahh, because majority of the people are being patriotic and nationalistic for the wrong reasons, because the majority, like you, have no clue what to be nationalistic on. There are however a lot who are and that gives me hope that these people will start doing something and waking everybody else up like I try to do.

I am already tired of seeing headlines printed in capital letters saying bad things toward this nation. I am already tired of hearing gossips about the fast-rising economy of this country and yet no one in the lower class can feel it.

Again, DO something about it. Talk about it. Fight for it. What do you think all those who fight for our people and country do? What do you think of all those militant groups like Bayan and Anakbayan do every single day? Sleep? Nah, they do what they do because they are fighting for our country and people but all the media does is claim them as rebels and trouble makers because the media is influenced by the elite again anyway. Want to break that down? Fight for it. Fight for our struggles and help educate others on issues and speaking out on the lies the media and people of power spit right back to the people.

We cannot eliminate corruption because corruption is already part of our system since academe. We are bound to use power to acquire money and other things.

If only we surrendered and let the American people guide us to success, then claiming the islands in our West Philippine Sea would’ve been easier than this.

Then stop voting for corrupt politicians and again fight and help wake up those who are so brainwashed and fuckin colonized. Take them down and stop buying into what the media says and again fight.

And if we let the U.S. people “guide us to success”, we would just be where Native Americans and Hawai’ians stand today. Losing lands, losing jobs, being discriminated against, being seen as nothing more than “the little brown people of Asia”, losing our languages and cultures, people missing and raped left and right and the government not doing a thing.

So here is my message for ya and a little gif to explain my feelings for you, and every other damn fuckin person who wants the Philippines to be the fuckin 51st state.

My rant on my personal blog because sadly, these people exist and do want the Philippines to be the 51st American state and be a colony again. I haven’t put up any info on the U.S. colonization of the Philippines and their atrocities and the genocide of Filipin@’s yet on this blog, but those links above and what I put down I think will be enough for now.

It’s really amazing that OP managed to post their arguments when they are obviously drowning in the great wide Kool-Aid Ocean.

NaGraNoWriMo and NaNoWriMo

thisisnotpinoy:

October: Fil-Am Heritage month AND National Graphic Novel Writing Month

November: National Novel Writing Month

Draw a comic or write something for these months and I reblog it on TINPinoy. :D

October

thisisnotpinoy:

In the Philippines: Indigenous People’s Month

In the USA: Filipino American Heritage Month

Double whammy

pinoy-culture:

Gabriela SilangHero’s and Heroines from the Philippines
María Josefa Gabriela Cariño Silang (March 19, 1731-September 29, 1763), or Gabriela Silang, was the first Filipino woman to lead a revolt during the Spanish colonization of the Philippines. An active member of the insurgent force of Diego Silang, her husband, she led the group for four months after his death before she was captured and executed.
Born in Caniogan, Ilocos Sur, Silang was a mestiza of Filipinos of Spanish and Ilocano descent. She was adopted by a wealthy businessman who later married her at the age of 20, but left after three years. In 1757, she married again, this time to 27-year-old indigenous Ilocano rebel leader, Diego Silang. She became one of his closest advisors, a major figure in her husband’s collaboration with the British and the brief expulsion of Spanish officials in Vigan, Ilocos Sur.
On May 28, 1763, her husband was assassinated by order of royal and church authorities in Manila. After her husband’s death, she fled on horseback to the mountains of Abra to establish her headquarters, reassemble her troops, and rally the Tingguian community to fight. They descended on Vigan on September 10, 1763. But the Spanish garrison was ready, amassing Spanish, Tagalog, and Kapampangan soldiers and Ilocano collaborators to ambush her and rout her forces. Many were killed. She escaped, alongside her uncle Nicolas and seven other men, but was later caught on September 29, 1763. They were summarily hanged in Vigan’s plaza, with Gabriela being the last to die.
Her ferocity and death became a symbol for Filipino women, their pre-colonial importance in Filipino society and their struggle for liberation during colonization. Today there are several monuments in honor of this Ilokano heroine, one of them in at the heart of Ayala Avenue in Makati City in 1971 created by Jose M. Mendoza and was placed by the Zobel de Ayala Family and inaugurated by Gabriela Silang’s great-granddaughter Gloria Cariño and her great-grandson Mario Cariño Merritt.

pinoy-culture:

Gabriela Silang
Hero’s and Heroines from the Philippines

María Josefa Gabriela Cariño Silang (March 19, 1731-September 29, 1763), or Gabriela Silang, was the first Filipino woman to lead a revolt during the Spanish colonization of the Philippines. An active member of the insurgent force of Diego Silang, her husband, she led the group for four months after his death before she was captured and executed.

Born in Caniogan, Ilocos Sur, Silang was a mestiza of Filipinos of Spanish and Ilocano descent. She was adopted by a wealthy businessman who later married her at the age of 20, but left after three years. In 1757, she married again, this time to 27-year-old indigenous Ilocano rebel leader, Diego Silang. She became one of his closest advisors, a major figure in her husband’s collaboration with the British and the brief expulsion of Spanish officials in Vigan, Ilocos Sur.

On May 28, 1763, her husband was assassinated by order of royal and church authorities in Manila. After her husband’s death, she fled on horseback to the mountains of Abra to establish her headquarters, reassemble her troops, and rally the Tingguian community to fight. They descended on Vigan on September 10, 1763. But the Spanish garrison was ready, amassing Spanish, Tagalog, and Kapampangan soldiers and Ilocano collaborators to ambush her and rout her forces. Many were killed. She escaped, alongside her uncle Nicolas and seven other men, but was later caught on September 29, 1763. They were summarily hanged in Vigan’s plaza, with Gabriela being the last to die.

Her ferocity and death became a symbol for Filipino women, their pre-colonial importance in Filipino society and their struggle for liberation during colonization. Today there are several monuments in honor of this Ilokano heroine, one of them in at the heart of Ayala Avenue in Makati City in 1971 created by Jose M. Mendoza and was placed by the Zobel de Ayala Family and inaugurated by Gabriela Silang’s great-granddaughter Gloria Cariño and her great-grandson Mario Cariño Merritt.

For those who would like to learn Tagalog

thelanguagecommunity:

pinoy-culture:

Badjao GirlsBarangay Bawing, General Santos City, Philippines.
The Badjaos are popularly known as the “Sea Gypsies” (note from Pinoy-Culture: I don’t particularly like that term, considering the term gypsy is a racist slur) of the Sulu and Celebes seas. They are generally boat dwellers whose religion is ancestor worship mixed with Islamic influences.The term “Badjao” is a Malay-Borneo word which connotes “man of the seas” or Orang Laut in Bahasa Melayu.The Badjaos call themselves as Sama Laus(Sea Sama).
Badjaos maybe divided into two groups: the southern Badjao and the northern Badjao. The southern Badjao is located on the islands of Tawi-Tawi, Sibutu and Semporna(Sabah) while the northern Badjao is located in Siasi, Jolo, Basilan and Zamboanga.
The Badjaos are an oppressed people. They are referred to a palao or lumaan (God forsaken) by the Tausugs.
The Badjaos speak of the language Sinama, which is a dialect of Samal language. Their livelihood is totally dependent o­n the resources of the sea - fishes, seaweeds, shells and so forth, either for food or to sell/barter for other necessities such as clothing, materials for boat construction, matobes, and fishing equipment.
A sea ritual makes the Badjaos childbirth practice somewhat peculiar. The newly born infant is thrown into the sea. Other people dive after it to rescue it. This ritual is simply an initiation into the reality of the Badjao life which is based on kinship with the sea.
Badjaos can be divided into three types based on their form of residence: the sedentary, with commercial pursuits and permanent homes; the semisedentary, who spends periods alternately between their houseboats and village homes; and the sea gypsies, who live in houseboats as itinerant fisher folk in search of rich fishing grounds.
The Badjaos have no permanent dwellings and live on their boats throughout the year. In some places, the Badjaos have built houses usually 20 to 30 feet long with a width of 15 feet thereby forming a perfect rectangle. Fronting their house is an open platform to serve as boat landing stage.
Marriage among the Badjaos is usually arranged by the parents of the bride and the groom. It is characterized by the dowry giving by the groom.

Bolded mine, because I am terrified of water and reading that made my eyes pop out of my head.

pinoy-culture:

Badjao Girls
Barangay Bawing, General Santos City, Philippines.

The Badjaos are popularly known as the “Sea Gypsies” (note from Pinoy-Culture: I don’t particularly like that term, considering the term gypsy is a racist slur) of the Sulu and Celebes seas. They are generally boat dwellers whose religion is ancestor worship mixed with Islamic influences.The term “Badjao” is a Malay-Borneo word which connotes “man of the seas” or Orang Laut in Bahasa Melayu.The Badjaos call themselves as Sama Laus(Sea Sama).

Badjaos maybe divided into two groups: the southern Badjao and the northern Badjao. The southern Badjao is located on the islands of Tawi-Tawi, Sibutu and Semporna(Sabah) while the northern Badjao is located in Siasi, Jolo, Basilan and Zamboanga.

The Badjaos are an oppressed people. They are referred to a palao or lumaan (God forsaken) by the Tausugs.

The Badjaos speak of the language Sinama, which is a dialect of Samal language. Their livelihood is totally dependent o­n the resources of the sea - fishes, seaweeds, shells and so forth, either for food or to sell/barter for other necessities such as clothing, materials for boat construction, matobes, and fishing equipment.

A sea ritual makes the Badjaos childbirth practice somewhat peculiar. The newly born infant is thrown into the sea. Other people dive after it to rescue it. This ritual is simply an initiation into the reality of the Badjao life which is based on kinship with the sea.

Badjaos can be divided into three types based on their form of residence: the sedentary, with commercial pursuits and permanent homes; the semisedentary, who spends periods alternately between their houseboats and village homes; and the sea gypsies, who live in houseboats as itinerant fisher folk in search of rich fishing grounds.

The Badjaos have no permanent dwellings and live on their boats throughout the year. In some places, the Badjaos have built houses usually 20 to 30 feet long with a width of 15 feet thereby forming a perfect rectangle. Fronting their house is an open platform to serve as boat landing stage.

Marriage among the Badjaos is usually arranged by the parents of the bride and the groom. It is characterized by the dowry giving by the groom.

Bolded mine, because I am terrified of water and reading that made my eyes pop out of my head.

pinoy-culture:

Felino Punsalan, 96 and other Filipino WWII Veterans surrenders medals and uniforms to culminate 20 year of lobbying for full recognition as American veterans. US House Chairman Jeff Miller denied request for hearing. These veterans fought courageously alongside the U.S. American soldiers during WWII that took place in Philippine soil that took a lot of damage not just for our country but our people and those who fought in the war.  It is an injustice, one that the U.S. won’t honor and care for like so many others that they either cast aside or deny, and it’s an injustice toward our Filipino Veterans.

etopilipinas:

Filipina looking really nice. Post war Philippines by John T Pilot on Flickr.


Ahem, I think you meant STYLING.

etopilipinas:

Filipina looking really nice. Post war Philippines by John T Pilot on Flickr.

Ahem, I think you meant STYLING.